Clinical Operations

Clinical Operations

A core element of the clinical trial process, Clinical Operations ensures that trials follow all required protocols and run smoothly. The discipline offers opportunities to play a part in delivering high-quality clinical research activity by designing, planning, and running phase I – IV clinical trials in the drug discovery industry.

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of roles in the sector is expected to increase by 17% by 2024 . Finding top talent for the Clinical Operations roles in your company can be challenging and time-consuming. As a trusted life sciences talent partner of leading companies and startups, EPM Scientific will source and deliver the best candidates when you need them.

How we can help

For more than a decade, EPM Scientific has built a solid reputation by investing in the further development of our talent experts and in world-class technologies, which has assisted us in building an extensive professional network. This allows us to source the best talent for hard-to-fill Clinical Operations roles and place them quickly and effectively so that they can help drive your company goals. This approach is one reason we are the preferred talent partner of major companies in the life sciences sector.

Clinical Operations talent solutions

Finding the best talent or new career opportunities in Clinical Operations is easier with EPM Scientific. Our hubs around the world provide permanent, contract, and multi-hire talent solutions, making it possible to connect you with professionals. We will consult with you to better understand your needs before finding and delivering the right people for the roles at your company.

Additionally, we offer bespoke contingent and retained services, and we have a wide network of interim managers and contractors that allows us to fill long-term and time-critical roles with the right people.

We also offer our clients a competitive advantage with value adding services such as salary guidance, account management, and bespoke analysis.

Don’t just take our word for it

“EPM Scientific has demonstrated that they are a trusted partner when it comes to recruiting for life sciences clients and guiding candidates through the offer steps, representing both the client and candidate equally and transparently. They know the Clinical Operations space and understand the challenges that come with this competitive landscape. EPM Scientific has been a joy to work with!”Jenny Breselow, Talent Acquisition Lead, Pliant


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Benefits of working with us

Experience

We have over a decade’s worth of experience as a leading talent partner in Life Sciences & Pharma.

Network

A vast, global network of the best, in-demand professionals, working with the world’s largest Life Sciences institutions, to take drugs, devices and therapeutic applications through from conception to completion.

Knowledge

Our award-winning talent specialists offer bespoke, tailored guidance on the latest hiring trends and industry news to help you achieve your goals.

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Clinical Operations Jobs

EPM Scientific places individuals seeking to take the next step in their careers across a variety of Clinical Operations roles at industry-leading companies.

Associate Director Program Management

Associate Director Program Management Salary: ($140,000-$185,000) San Francisco Bay Area (hybrid 3+ days per week) My client is a Bay Area based Biotech that is developing cutting-edge treatments in cell therapy. Their pipeline consists of several programs, with a total of over 6 indications in the clinic. They are currently building out their Program Management team and are looking to bring on a cross-functional Associate Director Program Management that will report directly into the Director PM. Responsibilities: Provide cross-functional program management experience to pre-clinical, clinical, regulatory, CMC, etc. Develop and help execute timelines/roadmap for portfolio strategy The ideal candidate for this role will have: 4+ years of experience in cross-functional Program/Project/Portfolio Management Strong understanding of different regulatory bodies globally (FDA, EMA, APAC, etc.) Ability to successfully communicate with different department heads This company provides a competitive total rewards package: Annual bonus Equity Health, vision, dental insurance 401(k) match program Please apply now if you're interested!

US$140000 - US$185000 per year
San Francisco
Apply

Director Clinical Operations

Director Clinical Operations USA (Remote) $200,000 - $235,000 Job Description A Global, commercial stage biotech focusing on creating novel cell therapeies in the oncology space is looking to grow as they hire a Director of Clinical Operations. With a drug already approved (in the US and EU), they are backed by a proven drug platform and tons of financial stability. What makes this opportunity interesting is that they are still in a growth phase, so there is vast opportunity for vertical mobility within. With a robust pipeline, and partners from various large pharmaceutical companies, opportunities like this don't come around often. Key Qualifications Bachelor's degree in a life science related field 10+ years of oncology experience at a Biotech or Pharmaceutical company (not CRO) Regulatory authority inspection experience highly preferred Experience planning and managing T-Cell therapies required Excellent verbal and written communication skills, with the ability to effetively communicate with internal teams, external stakeholders, and study sites. Strong understanding of regulatory requirements governing clinical trials, including FDA regulations, ICH-GCP guidelines, and other relevant standards Roles and Responsibilities Manage, mentor, and oversee the development of new clinical staff and a small number of CTM's Facilitate end to end clinical trial management activies both domestically and globally, including study planning, start up, and execution Oversee vendor selection and manage various CRO's and vendors Define timelines and deliverables while working closely with the Senior Director Clinical Operations Oversee site selection, initiation, and ongoing monitoring activities to ensure sites are conducting trials according to protocol and in compliance with GCP standards Benefits Medical Dental 401(k) PTO

US$200000 - US$235000 per year
United States of America
Apply

Clinical Study Lead

Our client, a leading biotech company based in Japan is seeking to hire someone with expertise in this field. As the Clinical Study Lead, you will be responsible for overseeing and managing all aspects of clinical studies related to their products. Responsibilities: Plan and execute various phases of clinical trials Ensure compliance with regulatory requirements Manage budgets, timelines and resource allocation Collaborate with cross-functional teams including medical affairs, research & development etc. Qualifications: To qualify as our ideal candidate you should possess; Relevant academic qualifications e.g Medical Device or Healthcare-related degree programs Demonstrated experience having managed multiple global/ regional phase II/III clinical trial projects within Oncology therapeutic area(s). Strong communication skills both verbal and written; fluency in English required; Japanese language proficiency preferred but not mandatory. If you are interested, please apply with your CV attached

Negotiable
Tokyo
Apply

Director / Sr. Director, Clinical Operations

Salary: $210K-250K Company Summary: A global immuno-oncology focused biotech with an impressive track record is seeking a Director or Sr. Director of Clinical Operations for a hybrid (3 days on site) role located in South San Francisco, CA. Since their first clinical trials in 2006, they've had 3 approvals already on the market. Currently, they have 8 indications in Phases II and III, so they are looking for a driven, growth-oriented Director/SD to head up their late phase IO studies. The Director/Sr. Director, Clin Ops will be responsible for: Managing CTMs to ensure timely execution of Phase 3 studies Supervising study programs as well as participating in the preparation of study budgets and contract negotiations Contributing to cross functional development of departmental policies Overseeing vendors in conjunction with study managers Periodic travel (< 20%) An ideal candidate for this role MUST have… 7+ years of biopharma INDUSTRY experience 6+ years of senior management experience - IO or complex trial experience PREFERRED A Bachelor's degree in Biological Sciences, Nursing, Pharmacy or a related discipline A working knowledge of ICH GCP guidelines Benefits: Competitive salary with benefits (90% Medical HMO Coverage) High degree of commercial exposure early in your career Being a part of team whose work directly aims to improve the quality of people's lives Great work-life balance If you are interested in this Director/Sr. Director of Clin Ops position, drop a CV!

US$215000 - US$250000 per year
San Francisco
Apply

Associate Director / Director, Clinical Operations

Salary: $210K-250K *** *Must be in SF or local to SF area** Company Summary: A global immunology focused biotech with an impressive track record is seeking an Associate Director or Director of Clinical Operations for a hybrid role located in Palo Alto, CA. Their aim is to create a best-in-class immunotherapy to treat unmet needs within the autoimmune and oncology spaces. Currently, they have 6 indications in Phases II and III, so they are looking for a driven, growth-oriented AD/Director, Clinical Operations to head up their Phase III studies. The Associate Director or Director will be responsible for: Managing CTMs to ensure timely execution of Phase 3 studies Supervising study programs as well as participating in the preparation of study budgets and contract negotiations Contributing to cross functional development of departmental policies Overseeing vendors in conjunction with study managers Periodic travel (< 20%) An ideal candidate for this role MUST have… 7+ years of biopharma INDUSTRY experience 6+ years of senior management experience - rare disease / oncology / immunology therapeutic experience greatly PREFERRED A Bachelor's degree in Biological Sciences, Nursing, Pharmacy or a related discipline A working knowledge of ICH GCP guidelines Benefits: Competitive salary with benefits (100% Medical HMO Coverage) High degree of commercial exposure early in your career Being a part of team whose work directly aims to improve the quality of people's lives Great work-life balance If you are interested in this Associate Director/Director role, please apply!

US$210000 - US$250000 per year
San Francisco
Apply

Sr. Clinical Trial Manager

Salary: $150-190K ***Candidates MUST be able to come on-site 3 days a week in South San Francisco*** Company Summary: Working with a clinical-stage biotech company that's looking for a Clinical Trial Manager/Sr. CTM to come into their SSF office on a hybrid/full-time basis. Their mission is to create best-in-class treatments for liver, metabolic, and rare diseases. The CTM/SCTM will play a pivotal role in the oversight and management of their NASH studies. The CTM/Sr. CTM will be responsible for: Reporting directly into the Director, Clinical Operations Managing global trials ensuring they are conducted in accordance with protocols, timelines, and budgets Assisting in the management of key study-related activities and deliverables Coordinating and contributing to the design of study materials and protocols Conducting (co)monitoring visits (pre-study, initiation, monitoring, and closeout) with CRO An ideal candidate for this role MUST have… 5 years of biopharma INDUSTRY experience REQUIRED 2 years of trial management experience REQUIRED Experience in hepatology, metabolic disease, and rare disease therapeutic areas PREFERRED A working knowledge of ICH GCP guidelines An undergraduate degree in a relevant field of study Benefits: Pre-IPO biotech company with good runway Competitive salary with comprehensive benefits (20% bonus, medical, dental, and vision) Flexible PTO arrangements 401K contribution

US$150000 - US$190000 per year
San Francisco
Apply

Director Clinical Operations

Director Clinical Operations USA (Remote) $200,000 - $235,000 Job Description A Global, commercial stage biotech focusing on creating novel cell therapeies in the oncology space is looking to grow as they hire a Director of Clinical Operations. With a drug already approved (in the US and EU), they are backed by a proven drug platform and tons of financial stability. What makes this opportunity interesting is that they are still in a growth phase, so there is vast opportunity for vertical mobility within. With a robust pipeline, and partners from various large pharmaceutical companies, opportunities like this don't come around often. Key Qualifications Bachelor's degree in a life science related field 10+ years of oncology experience at a Biotech or Pharmaceutical company (not CRO) Regulatory authority inspection experience highly preferred Experience planning and managing T-Cell therapies required Excellent verbal and written communication skills, with the ability to effetively communicate with internal teams, external stakeholders, and study sites. Strong understanding of regulatory requirements governing clinical trials, including FDA regulations, ICH-GCP guidelines, and other relevant standards Roles and Responsibilities Manage, mentor, and oversee the development of new clinical staff and a small number of CTM's Facilitate end to end clinical trial management activies both domestically and globally, including study planning, start up, and execution Oversee vendor selection and manage various CRO's and vendors Define timelines and deliverables while working closely with the Senior Director Clinical Operations Oversee site selection, initiation, and ongoing monitoring activities to ensure sites are conducting trials according to protocol and in compliance with GCP standards Benefits Medical Dental 401(k) PTO

US$200000 - US$235000 per year
United States of America
Apply

Sr. Clinical Trial Manager

Salary: $150-190K ***Candidates MUST be able to come on-site 3 days a week in South San Francisco*** Company Summary: Working with a clinical-stage biotech company that's looking for a Clinical Trial Manager/Sr. CTM to come into their SSF office on a hybrid/full-time basis. Their mission is to create best-in-class treatments for liver, metabolic, and rare diseases. The CTM/SCTM will play a pivotal role in the oversight and management of their NASH studies. The CTM/Sr. CTM will be responsible for: Reporting directly into the Director, Clinical Operations Managing global trials ensuring they are conducted in accordance with protocols, timelines, and budgets Assisting in the management of key study-related activities and deliverables Coordinating and contributing to the design of study materials and protocols Conducting (co)monitoring visits (pre-study, initiation, monitoring, and closeout) with CRO An ideal candidate for this role MUST have… 5 years of biopharma INDUSTRY experience REQUIRED 2 years of trial management experience REQUIRED Experience in hepatology, metabolic disease, and rare disease therapeutic areas PREFERRED A working knowledge of ICH GCP guidelines An undergraduate degree in a relevant field of study Benefits: Pre-IPO biotech company with good runway Competitive salary with comprehensive benefits (20% bonus, medical, dental, and vision) Flexible PTO arrangements 401K contribution

US$150000 - US$190000 per year
San Francisco
Apply

Sr. Clinical Trial Manager

Salary: $150-190K ***Candidates MUST be able to come on-site 3 days a week in South San Francisco*** Company Summary: Working with a clinical-stage biotech company that's looking for a Clinical Trial Manager/Sr. CTM to come into their SSF office on a hybrid/full-time basis. Their mission is to create best-in-class treatments for liver, metabolic, and rare diseases. The CTM/SCTM will play a pivotal role in the oversight and management of their NASH studies. The CTM/Sr. CTM will be responsible for: Reporting directly into the Director, Clinical Operations Managing global trials ensuring they are conducted in accordance with protocols, timelines, and budgets Assisting in the management of key study-related activities and deliverables Coordinating and contributing to the design of study materials and protocols Conducting (co)monitoring visits (pre-study, initiation, monitoring, and closeout) with CRO An ideal candidate for this role MUST have… 5 years of biopharma INDUSTRY experience REQUIRED 2 years of trial management experience REQUIRED Experience in hepatology, metabolic disease, and rare disease therapeutic areas PREFERRED A working knowledge of ICH GCP guidelines An undergraduate degree in a relevant field of study Benefits: Pre-IPO biotech company with good runway Competitive salary with comprehensive benefits (20% bonus, medical, dental, and vision) Flexible PTO arrangements 401K contribution

US$150000 - US$190000 per year
San Francisco
Apply

Associate Director / Director, Clinical Operations

Salary: $185K-210K Company Summary: A global immunology focused pharmaceutical group with an impressive track record is seeking an Associate Director of Clinical Operations for a hybrid role located in Palo Alto, CA. Their commercial supply of pharmaceutical products generated $83m in revenue in FY2023 (a 24% uptick from the year prior). Since their first clinical trials in 2006, they've had 3 approvals already on the market. Currently, they have 6 indications in Phases II and III, so they are looking for a driven, growth-oriented Senior Clinical Trial Manager to head up their Phase III studies. The Associate Director will be responsible for: Managing CTMs to ensure timely execution of Phase 3 studies Supervising study programs as well as participating in the preparation of study budgets and contract negotiations Contributing to cross functional development of departmental policies Overseeing vendors in conjunction with study managers Periodic travel (< 20%) An ideal candidate for this role MUST have… 7+ years of biopharma INDUSTRY experience 6+ years of senior management experience - rare disease / autoimmune / immunology therapeutic experience greatly PREFERRED A Bachelor's degree in Biological Sciences, Nursing, Pharmacy or a related discipline A working knowledge of ICH GCP guidelines Benefits: Competitive salary with benefits (100% Medical HMO Coverage) High degree of commercial exposure early in your career Being a part of team whose work directly aims to improve the quality of people's lives Great work-life balance If you are interested in this Associate Director/Director role, don't hesitate to reach out!

US$185000 - US$210000 per year
San Francisco
Apply

Senior Clinical Research Associate (SCRA)

Salary: $120-139K Company Summary: Working with a precision IO biotechnology company to build out their clinical operations team and they are currently looking for a Sr. Clinical Research Associate (SCRA) on a hybrid capacity in their SF office. Their mission is to develop best-in-class immunotherapies to address unmet needs within the oncology space. Their primary focus is on their Phase I FIH solid tumor study and this role will be instrumental in supporting study operational tasks. The Sr. CRA will be responsible for: Supporting study operational activities under the direction of the clinical study lead Assisting with trial related tasks including oversight and management of CROs and other study vendors Providing support to ensure that studies are completed on time, within budget, and in compliance with SOPs and applicable regulatory requirements Maintaining study registries and dashboards Approx. 20% travel depending on study/project needs An ideal candidate for this role MUST have… 4 years of industry experience REQUIRED 2 years oncology experience Global trial experience preferred A Bachelor's degree in Biological Sciences, Nursing, Pharmacy or a related discipline A working knowledge of ICH GCP guidelines Benefits: Pre-IPO biotech company Competitive salary with comprehensive benefits (90% medical coverage) Flexible PTO and WFH arrangements 401K contribution Cell phone reimbursement, life insurance, and additional perks If you are interested in this Sr. CRA role, don't hesitate to reach out!

US$121000 - US$139000 per year
San Francisco
Apply

Associate Director Clinical Operations

Salary: $175,000-$200,000 Associate Director Clinical Operations Boston (Hybrid) Job Description Join an innovative biotech company at the forefront of cutting-edge research dedicated to tackling rare diseases. Their unwavering commitment to innovation drives them to the frontlines of scientific discovery, where they focus their energies on an extraordinary mission: combating rare diseases that have long been neglected by traditional pharmaceutical approaches. What sets them apart is their audacious spirit, tireless dedication, and the belief that no challenge is insurmountable. They stand at the intersection of cutting-edge science and compassionate care, working tirelessly to provide hope where it has been scarce and solutions where they have been elusive. As an Associate Director of Clinical Operations, you will be an integral part of our mission-driven team. Responsibilities Identify and proactively address potential risks and issues in clinical trials, implementing mitigation plans to ensure trial success Provide leadership and mentorship to clinical operations teams, fostering a collaborative and high-performance work environment while managing and developing talent within the department Collaborate with cross-functional teams to develop and execute clinical trial strategies aligned with the company's goals and objectives Ensure that all clinical operations comply with regulatory requirements and industry standards, maintaining the highest quality standards in study conduct and documentation Oversee relationships with CRO's, vendors, and external partners, ensuring their performance aligns with project objectives and budgets Qualifications 8+ years of hands-on experience in clinical operations within the biotech or pharmaceutical industry, including direct involvement in planning and managing clinical trials A deep understanding of rare disease clinical trials, including knowledge of the unique challenges and considerations associated with these trials, is highly desirable At least a bachelor's degree in a relevant life sciences field Excellent verbal and written communication skills, including the ability to convey complex scientific and clinical information to both technical and non-technical stakeholders Proficiency in regulatory compliance and an in-depth understanding of international regulations and guidelines related to clinical trial conduct Benefits Medical, dental, vision insurance 401(k) PTO and Holidays

US$175000 - US$200000 per year
United States of America
Apply

Clinical Operations News & Insights

In-Demand Clinical Research Skills and Experience to Highlight in Your Next Interview Image
clinical-operations

In-Demand Clinical Research Skills and Experience to Highlight in Your Next Interview

​Like the wider life sciences industry, the Clinical Research arena is fiercely competitive. If you want to advance your career, you need to stand out from the crowd. One of the best ways to do this in an industry in which knowledge and expertise matter is to highlight your in-demand Clinical Research skills and experience in your next interview.EPM Scientific sheds light on which skills and areas of experience to focus on, including knowledge of clinical trial design, methodology, and statistical concepts, clinical expertise, project management and teamwork, soft skills, and critical thinking and decision-making.Thorough working knowledge of clinical trial design, methodology, and statistical conceptsGiven the importance of clinical trial design, methodology, and statistical concepts in Clinical Research, it’s vitally important that you convey a thorough working knowledge of these processes. You may be tested on your basic knowledge of these processes by being asked to walk the interviewers through the different phases of a trial. Your answer should demonstrate that you understand the key characteristics and purpose of each process.You should also highlight how you would handle incomplete or missing data in a clinical trial, as well as the statistical methods you use to analyze data obtained in a clinical trial. Take time to think about questions you might be asked about this in an interview, such as giving an example of a clinical trial in which you had to deal with missing or incomplete data, and explaining how you overcame the problem.Highlighting clinical expertiseIt’s not enough to know about the various processes involved in Clinical Research. In your next interview at a life sciences company, ensure you also highlight your clinical expertise.When showcasing your medical/scientific expertise and technical skills, go beyond demonstrating your knowledge of guidelines. You should also explain how you ensure data quality and integrity in clinical trials, focusing on your understanding and previous application of best practices such as standard operating procedure adherence, data validation, and source data verification. A good way to think of examples of your expertise is to think about interview questions you might be asked, such as explaining the steps you followed when analyzing and applying data during a project that posed various logistical challenges that could have impacted data purity.Project management and teamworkExcellent teamworking abilities are an in-demand skill for any Clinical Research role, whether junior or senior. When it comes to senior roles, you also need strong project management skills to lead a team and manage timelines and deliverables.In your next interview, highlight your project management and teamwork skills. Explain how you communicate and coordinate with study coordinators, investigators, and other team members during a clinical trial, and describe how you have managed study-related logistics such as patient recruitment and scheduling. You might find it helpful to think about possible questions you could be asked, such as explaining how you manage disparate teams faced with various challenges in a time-critical project.The importance of soft skillsThere’s a high demand for individuals with specific soft skills in Clinical Research. These skills include communication, collaboration, attention to detail, and problem-solving.Prepare for this stage of the interview by thinking about specific examples that illustrate your skill at communicating complex ideas effectively, focusing on the techniques you used and how you engaged your audience. For example, if you have communicated complex scientific information to a non-scientific audience, explain how you made sure your audience understood your presentation.Think of examples of times when you prioritized and managed multiple projects simultaneously, focusing on how you made sure that deadlines were met, and everything was accounted for. You may also find it helpful to think about how you can showcase your collaboration and problem-solving skills during your interview. Doing this can help you to start formulating answers to questions you might be asked. Also consider other questions that interviewers might ask, such as being asked to provide examples of how you managed to meet deadlines whilst managing multiple projects that included collaboration with various different stakeholders, or how you solved an issue that could have affected project timelines. Critical thinking and decision makingCritical thinking and decision making are fundamental to any Clinical Research role, making them key skills to highlight in your next interview. Convey your ability to analyze observations and data, and to make informed decisions.In order to assess your attention to detail and problem-solving abilities, you may be asked to describe a time when you discovered an error in research or data and to explain how you addressed it. You might also be asked to explain how you would respond to a situation in which a participant in a trial experienced an adverse event. Highlight what steps you would take to ensure participant safety and the integrity of the study. Emphasize your ability to stay grounded, calm, compassionate, and organized during a crisis.Secure your next role with EPM ScientificAdvancing your career in Clinical Research and life sciences is easier with EPM Scientific. Take a look at our open roles for an excellent idea of the many opportunities available. Find your next role with us. Register your resume or browse our latest roles today.

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Life Sciences Salary Guides of 2023 Image
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Life Sciences Salary Guides of 2023

Are you aiming to advance your career within the life sciences sector? Are you interested in discovering your competitors‘ offerings for professionals in your field across the APAC region? We are excited to present our new series of Salary Guides for the life sciences industry. These comprehensive reports will furnish you with invaluable insights into the present salary trends in Singapore, China, Australia, South Korea, and Japan.Compiled from the responses of almost 900 life sciences professionals in the APAC region, this is an opportunity you shouldn't overlook. Seize the chance to gain a competitive advantage in the life sciences field, enabling you to make well-informed choices about your career trajectory, compensation, and hiring approaches.

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Challenges to Talent Acquisition in the Life Sciences Industry  Image
clinical-operations

Challenges to Talent Acquisition in the Life Sciences Industry

Although the Life Sciences industry is thriving, with healthcare now the largest employer by industry in the US, there are several key challenges in the sector that are generating significant competition when it comes to talent acquisition. According to Grant Thornton Global, skills and skilled people have become rare and in-demand commodities, and the rising expenses associated with inflation also have the power to limit profit growth in the foreseeable future.Moreover, Life Science occupations had the second-lowest unemployment rate of all occupations in the US as of mid-2022, according to insights from CBRE. There is also an increased focus on ESG (environmental, social, and governance) practices, leading to a rapidly changing regulatory environment and a stronger focus on technology playing a key role in R&D investment trends and scientific progress.This article will address these key challenges to talent acquisition in the current Life Sciences landscape and describe how to secure essential talent to keep your own organization robust and efficient.Deliver a personal candidate experienceOne of the most efficient methods for establishing your talent acquisition strategy is to provide a personalized candidate and hiring experience. Get to know your interviewees on a personal level to gain more insights into their unique motivations, goals, and preferences, whether that’s a higher compensation package or more flexible working arrangements. Overall, it’s important for candidates to feel valued throughout the hiring process, particularly when seeking talent at senior levels within the Life Sciences industry.Nurture relationships throughout the hiring processA streamlined hiring process will enable your business to attract the best talent while minimizing the risk of encountering talent acquisition-related challenges in line with increased competition. Maintain clear communication with your applicants at all times and check in with each candidate from the very first touchpoint to the final interview. Not only will this help to build a stronger working relationship with professionals, a company that actively cultivates relationships during the hiring process demonstrates its commitment to securing top talent. By going the extra mile, you can make a lasting impression on candidates, setting yourself apart as an employer of choice.Provide valuable feedbackTransparency and timely feedback are essential parts of the talent acquisition process. In addition to helping candidates enhance their own professional development, providing constructive feedback contributes to a positive candidate experience. Feedback should be delivered promptly to maintain a sense of momentum and highlight a company’s dedication to the process and employees. Offering your candidates a chance to report honest feedback about their experiences may also create opportunities for referrals if the candidates enjoyed a positive experience with your organization.Utilize Life Sciences contractorsLife Sciences contractors and freelancers provide specialized expertise and offer a variety of benefits, making them a viable option for expanding your team alongside professionals looking for permanent roles. These benefits include flexibility, cost savings, reduced overheads, faster turnaround times, lower risk, fresh perspectives, and increased productivity.Make compelling role offersYour organization’s role offers should align with the motivations of your candidates. These motivations can range from compensation and benefits packages to specific company cultures and flexible working arrangements, such as part-time and full-time remote positions. Request honest feedback from your candidates about your hiring and talent retention strategies to ensure that you understand your potential hires’ key motivations and preferences.Retain top talentPrioritizing factors such as positive company culture, employee recognition and appreciation, professional development opportunities, and attractive compensation schemes can improve your talent retention rates. The Life Sciences career market is a highly competitive one, and implementing strategies to retain your top talent can help you give your organization a beneficial edge.Secure business-critical talent with EPM ScientificEPM Scientific understands the importance of finding top talent for every Life Sciences role. We offer the expertise that you need to secure critical talent for your business’s future. Submit a vacancy or request a call back from our team to learn how we can support your growth.

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clinical-development

Interview & Hiring Guidance

​5 essential tips for employers, hiring managers, and HR on the hiring process in Life SciencesThe interview process, from initial phone call screenings and psychometric testing, to face to face interviews with the hiring manager and onsite tours, can often be a long and laborious process. So it is imperative to keep an interview process streamlined and engaged, to ensure talent doesn’t drop out, and your organization, and yourself is represented best. Here are 5 vital top tips for employers to stick to when interviewing top talent. Be present Showing excitement to prospective candidates provides insights for them into the potential team culture and attitude. Asking them questions about themselves, on their interests, their lives, their careers, as opposed to only technical questions to vet their hard skills, goes a long way in connecting on a human level. Another way to connect is by sharing real life examples of the day to day, positive experiences about the role and team, and details about project work. These are important talking points candidates like to know, and while they understand an interview may be rigorous technically, maintaining the conversational, human aspect is important too. Being engaged may sound simple, but given how much of the interview process is over Zoom/VC/phone these days, it is easy to get distracted and check emails or open windows on your computer. Remaining attentive and interested will bring the best out of the interview process and provide a positive candidate experience. Also important is to be interesting yourself. Be in sell modeMany of the above points are indirect examples of selling your team and role. However, in a more overt way, providing exciting opportunities at present and for future career growth are always on candidates’ minds and knowing there is more to be excited about than just hands-on skills or what is in the job description on day one makes them buy into the role and organization more. As part of selling the role, explain why you took this position, and what you liked about the company and team. Be relatable to their circumstances and share with them why the position in your team, at your company, is the best move they can make.Another important aspect to highlight here is the culture. Maybe there is more to what makes the role great than just the daily tasks or responsibilities, such as company sports team, lunch clubs, charitable groups, or environmental initiatives. Highlight what else is enjoyable so that candidates are excited about this role, as well as the team and company, aside from the day to day. These days competition for top talent is so tight, that those cultural differences can distinguish you amongst the rest.Be positive Many of the above points translate to this aspect of hiring, but above all, being cordial, professional, and sharing timely feedback all contribute to a positive candidate experience. In some cases, the candidate may not be a good fit culturally, or for your position, but you should still offer them professionalism and positivity in the interview. Remember, they may have colleagues or a network of other experts that could be better suited for your role/team. You want them to have a positive experience to refer people to you, and maintain your company’s reputation in the market, as well as your own. It's also important to note that many candidates often have other processes in the mix, so if you give them any chances to doubt their experience, they could be more likely to go elsewhere. Be flexible If a professional isn’t the 100% right fit, still ask yourself if there is a place for them in the team or organization, especially if they bring something unique to the company. Keep an open mind when recruiting talent, and consider the future headcount. Potentially you can create a new role for an exceptional candidate, especially if you don’t want to lose someone good to a competitor. See the positives in a candidate’s skillset if they bring enough to the table, and find reasons to say yes, especially in this market. Outside of being flexible with the job description, can you also be flexible with the offer? Offering nuanced benefits, flexible working, and customizing offers to the individual joining can again make the difference between rejecting and accepting. Be decisive The market is still exceptionally hot, so it is vital hiring managers are mindful of how quick an interview process needs to be. “Keeping someone warm” is so important, but if you can’t commit to them you do risk them going in another direction. Therefore, be timely with your feedback, especially if it's positive, to keep the momentum up. If they are at the top of your mind, you should stay at the top of theirs. Try and push approvals quickly as well. This is often bureaucratic but affect whatever influence you can have on an interview or hiring process, and don’t allow things to slow down if you can control it.Finally, be competitive. Don’t allow back and forth negotiations to hinder a process or allow time for other processes to catch up. Put your best, most competitive offer forward so it entices them from the very start.  To hire the best candidate for your open role, get in touch with EPM Scientific today. As a specialist talent partner in Life Sciences, we have access to industry-leading talent around the world. Find the talent you need by submitting your vacancy, or request a call back below to elevate your hiring process with the right talent partner today.

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Management & Culture

The Reality of Freelance Work: What Hiring Managers Need to Know in the Life Sciences Industry

As a recruiter or hiring manager in the life sciences industry, you may have preconceived notions about freelance work for tech professionals. However, it's important to separate fact from fiction when it comes to these common myths. Here are seven myths you may have heard about freelance work and the truth behind them:​Myth #1: Freelance work is only for junior professionals Freelance work is not limited to junior professionals. While some people may think of freelance work as an entry-level job or a way for new graduates to get their foot in the door, the truth is that freelance work is a viable option for professionals at all levels of experience.In fact, many highly experienced professionals choose to freelance because it offers them greater flexibility and control over their work-life balance. Freelancing allows professionals to work on a variety of projects, gain exposure to different industries and technologies, and set their own schedules. It can also provide an opportunity to work with a variety of clients, which can help build a diverse portfolio of work.Additionally, freelancing can offer a way for experienced professionals to transition to a new career or industry. For example, a senior software developer may decide to freelance in order to gain experience in a new programming language or work on projects in a different industry. By freelancing, they can gain new skills and experiences while still leveraging their existing expertise.Myth #2: Freelancers are less committed than full-time employees Freelancers are just as committed to their work as full-time employees, if not more so. Freelancers rely on their reputation and word-of-mouth recommendations to generate new business, so they have a vested interest in providing high-quality work and meeting or exceeding their clients' expectations.Furthermore, freelancers are often highly skilled professionals who take pride in their work and strive to deliver the best possible results. They may be working on a project-by-project basis, but they understand that each project is an opportunity to showcase their skills and build their reputation.In addition, freelancers may have more control over their workload and schedule, which can help them stay focused and committed to their work. Freelancers can often choose the projects they want to work on and set their own deadlines, which can help them maintain a healthy work-life balance and avoid burnout.Myth #3: Freelancers are unreliable and hard to manage Freelancers are highly motivated individuals who understand the importance of meeting deadlines and communicating with their clients. While managing freelancers may be different from managing full-time employees, it is not inherently more difficult.In fact, managing freelancers can have some advantages. For example, freelancers are often self-starters who can work independently and take initiative to get things done. They may also have a more flexible schedule, which can allow them to work on projects outside of regular business hours and be more responsive to client needs.Communication is key to effectively managing freelancers. Clear expectations should be set at the beginning of the project, including deadlines, deliverables, and communication channels. Regular check-ins and status updates can help ensure that the project stays on track and any issues are addressed promptly.It's also important to establish a good working relationship with freelancers. Just like with full-time employees, building rapport and trust can help ensure a successful project. This includes treating freelancers with respect, providing timely feedback, and recognizing their contributions to the project.Myth #4: Freelancers are not as skilled as full-time employeesFreelancers are often highly skilled professionals who bring a wealth of knowledge and expertise to their projects. Many have worked in multiple industries and bring a diverse set of skills and experiences to the table.Freelancers may also have specialized skills or expertise that are hard to find in a full-time employee. For example, a company may need a freelance graphic designer who specializes in creating infographics, or a freelance software developer who has experience working with a specific programming language.Additionally, freelancers can be a valuable resource for companies that need to scale their workforce up or down quickly. If a company has a sudden influx of work, hiring a freelancer can provide an immediate solution without the need to go through a lengthy hiring process.It's also worth noting that freelancers often have a unique perspective on projects. Because they are not full-time employees, they may be able to bring a fresh perspective or innovative ideas to a project that may not have been considered otherwise.Myth #5: Freelance work is only for short-term projectsWhile freelance work is often associated with short-term projects, many freelancers work on long-term projects or even ongoing contracts. In fact, some freelancers have long-term relationships with their clients that span several years.Freelancers can provide a range of services, from short-term project-based work to ongoing support and maintenance. For example, a company may hire a freelance software developer to work on a specific project for a few months, or they may hire a freelance IT consultant to provide ongoing support and maintenance.In addition, freelancers can provide flexibility for companies that need to adjust their workforce quickly in response to changing business needs. If a company needs to downsize, they can simply end a contract with a freelancer without the need for a lengthy termination process.It's worth noting that long-term relationships with freelancers can provide some benefits beyond just the work being done. For example, freelancers who work with a company over a longer period of time may become more familiar with the company's processes and culture, which can lead to more effective collaboration.Myth #6: Freelancers are more expensive than full-time employees Freelancers may appear more expensive than full-time employees on paper, but when you factor in the costs of benefits, training, and overhead associated with full-time employees, freelancers can often be a more cost-effective option.Hiring a full-time employee can come with a range of costs beyond just their salary. Companies also need to provide benefits such as health insurance, retirement plans, and paid time off. Additionally, full-time employees require onboarding and training, and require a dedicated workspace and equipment.Freelancers, on the other hand, are responsible for their own benefits and equipment. They typically work remotely and have their own workspace and equipment, which can save companies money on office space and equipment costs.Furthermore, freelancers can be a more cost-effective option for companies that only need temporary or project-based support. Hiring a full-time employee for a short-term project may not be cost-effective, as the employee may not be fully utilized once the project is completed.Finally, freelancers can provide cost savings through their specialized expertise. They may be able to complete a project more quickly and efficiently than a full-time employee who does not have the same level of expertise.Myth #7: Freelancers are only for small businesses or startupsFreelancers can work with businesses of all sizes, from small startups to large multinational corporations. In fact, many Fortune 500 companies rely on freelancers to provide specialized skills and expertise on a project-by-project basis.Freelancers can provide a range of benefits to businesses of all sizes. For small businesses and startups, freelancers can provide cost-effective support and specialized expertise without the need to hire full-time employees. This can help small businesses scale their workforce up or down quickly in response to changing business needs.For larger companies, freelancers can provide specialized expertise and additional resources without the need to hire additional full-time employees. This can be especially useful for projects that require a specific set of skills or expertise that may not be available in-house.Additionally, freelancers can provide flexibility and scalability for businesses of all sizes. They can work on short-term or long-term projects, and can provide support on an as-needed basis. This can help businesses avoid the costs and administrative burden associated with hiring and managing full-time employees.​​Our Freelance ServicesAt EPM Scientific, we understand the challenges that life sciences companies face in finding the right talent, especially for short-term projects. That's why we offer a range of freelance staffing solutions to help companies find the right talent for their projects, whether it's for a short-term project or a long-term assignment.We work closely with our clients to understand their unique needs and requirements, and then leverage our network and expertise to find the best talent for their projects. Our team of specialized recruiters and consultants have a deep understanding of the life sciences industry and can provide top tech talent for your project needs.If you're looking for freelance talent for your life sciences company, request a call back today from our contracts team. We can provide ongoing support to ensure that your project is a success, and help you find the right talent to meet your specific project requirements.

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How to Ensure Employee Retention in Life Sciences Image
safety-pharmacovigilance

How to Ensure Employee Retention in Life Sciences

​The Pharmaceutical market has expanded considerably in the past two decades, with Pharma revenues totalling $1.42tn in 2021. This has been accompanied by a growing demand for experienced, highly qualified Life Sciences professionals: with more drugs than ever now available, companies require a strong workforce to bring their products to market. The industry has had to deal with an ever-small talent pool as a result, which has been exacerbated by one of the highest employee churn rates, with the Life Sciences and Medical Devices industry alone seeing a 20.6% turnover rate. This is reflected in the results of our Life Sciences survey which revealed that more than 40% of Life Sciences professionals are currently looking for a new role.The COVID-19 pandemic led to a substantial increase in resignations across all industries, as many employees started to re-evaluate their priorities and seek roles that offered flexible remote-work policies. Consequently, companies have found it harder to get the people they need. 47.8 million workers in the U.S. decided to quit their jobs in 2021 – the highest volume of resignations since the Bureau of Labor Statistics began recording this data in 2001. This is equivalent to 3.98 million workers quitting their jobs each month, up from an average of roughly 3m leaving their jobs each month in 2019.Similar trends have been observed in Australia and the UK, where the rate of employed people between 16-64 choosing to switch jobs reached an all-time high of 3.2% between October-December 2021. The resignation rate continued to increase in 2022, with job-to-job resignations in the UK peaking at 442,000 in the second quarter of 2022. In Europe, one in three workers are considering quitting their jobs in the near term, with inadequate compensation and lack of career advancement being cited as the top factors.Why are Life Sciences professionals leaving their roles?The reasons that Life Sciences professionals have for wanting to leave their jobs vary across each industry sector. However, the promise of higher remuneration is invariably the main reason. This is according to findings from our Year in Review, which goes into greater depth about the factors that matter most to Life Sciences professionals when seeking to advance their careers.There are a host of other important factors, however, such as the desire for an improved work-life balance and employees wanting to acquire more new skills that will aid in their professional development. Changes in management can also cause people to want to move jobs, and Life Sciences professionals are increasingly looking for openings that provide flexible working hours and the ability to work from home.How to improve employee retentionThe good news is that there is a wide range of employee retention strategies that you can adopt in your workplace. Let’s take a look at some of the most effective employee retention techniques that you can use to ensure that your employees are satisfied at work and remain highly motivated in their positions, as opposed to looking elsewhere for their big career break.Offer competitive salaries and benefitsDissatisfaction around salary has had a negative impact on talent retention in the Life Sciences sector. As we’ve seen across the board, wanting higher compensation is the top reason for employees wanting to move to jobs; 70% of the R&D professionals that we surveyed within the Pharmacological industry were motivated by the promise of higher compensation at other companies.Paying your team a competitive rate is a simple but effective employee retention strategy that you can use to avoid your workforce shrinking. Our survey results show that the majority of respondents want a pay rise upwards of 10-15% of their current salary, which provides some indication of how much you may need to offer in order to remain competitive. Focus on career developmentYour employees will be far less likely to want to continue working for you long-term if there are few opportunities for advancement – or if their ability to develop their skills is limited. A study by Work Institute found that employees quit in 20% of cases due to career development issues.This highlights the importance of setting clear paths for career progression to give your team the motivation and provide them with long-term goals.Be flexibleOffering flexible working arrangements is a sure-fire way to keep your employees happy. Our Year in Review revealed that the option to work from home is very important to 60% of the industry as a whole. The majority of R&D respondents deemed flexibility as either important or very important, and workers in Pharmacovigilance ranked flexibility higher than salary when asked what is most important when considering a new job.Whilst a lack of flexible working options will not be a deal-breaker for many employees, you will find it far easier to retain your top talent if you grant them greater freedom to work according to their preferences.Build a supportive company cultureThere’s nothing quite like a warm, friendly culture when it comes to getting excellent work out of your employees. It’s also one of the best ways to increase their loyalty to the company.Seeking feedback from employees on a regular basis about how working processes might be improved helps ensure that workers feel that their concerns are being heard and addressed. Providing senior employees with the skills and training that they need to be good managers is also a worthwhile endeavour. Manufacturing professionals regard good leadership as almost as important as salary, according to our Year in Review survey.Promote work-life balanceMore than a third of respondents in our Life Sciences Year in Review report highlighted a poor work-life balance as one of the main reasons for wanting to seek employment in another role. Almost half of the Clinical Pharmacology professionals surveyed cited a need for an improved work-life balance as their main reason for seeking a new position.With higher numbers of professionals re-evaluating their priorities in life in the wake of the COVID pandemic, it’s no wonder that Life Sciences professionals are seeking out positions that allow them to spend more time with their families and friends. Giving your employees more personal time is therefore one of the most effective strategies for employee retention.Offer innovative, up-to-date technologiesFinally, ensure that you have the latest technology in your workplace. Investing in top-of-the-range software, for example, will make it easier for your employees to complete tasks and reduce the errors that are made, thereby increasing company productivity and boosting morale.Employee retention is critical to successThriving companies are characterized by a happy, satisfied workforce and high employee retention rates. Partner with EPM Scientific, a leading executive search firm for the Life Sciences industry, to find out more about how you can implement employee retention strategies that get results. Request a call back and one of our specialist consultants will be in touch. ​

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How to Determine if a New Hire Will Fit into Your Company's Culture Image
Management & Culture

How to Determine if a New Hire Will Fit into Your Company's Culture

There’s no question that a company’s culture and ethos can help its employees feel more satisfied at work, increase employee retention and ultimately serve as a catalyst for its success. Company culture is seen as very important by professionals: survey data collected by Glassdoor shows that more than three quarters of professionals take the culture into account before applying for a job, and 56% say that they see the culture of a company as playing a more significant role than salary in determining overall job satisfaction. Given the role that it plays, cultural fit should be a key priority for employers.Why is cultural fit important?If somebody is a good cultural fit for a company, they are far more likely to be an engaged, motivated employee who derives satisfaction from their role. There is a greater chance that they will see the job as more than just a source of income and as such, they will be more likely to go above and beyond in the workplace and may even inspire others to follow in their footsteps.Hiring for cultural fit therefore makes good business sense. 10-25% of new employees decide to leave within six months of starting work, and one reason that professionals give for quitting is that they feel that they are a poor fit for the company culture. Choosing people for the job who are a natural fit for the company’s values and working practices is a great way to avoid these problems from arising.How to hire for cultural fit?Given the importance of company culture, businesses are increasingly hiring for cultural fit. This involves defining what your culture is all about and incorporating questions at interview stage that relate to your interviewees’ values, motivations and aspirations.Define your company’s cultureThe first step is to describe your company’s culture in writing. What are the values, beliefs and ethics that characterize your company’s operations and working environment? If you are struggling to capture the essence of your culture, it might be worth asking current employees about how they feel about the company and its working practices. It is recommended that you use such feedback when writing or updating a mission statement and articulating your company values. Include these on your website and on all your digital platforms, in addition to testimonials from your current employees.Demonstrate your values throughout the interview processAsking values-based interview questions is one of the best ways to identify candidates who share your values and will be a good fit in the workplace.You should also draw attention to the benefits that you offer your employees. 56% of CFOs in the Asia-Pacific (APAC) have said that they are considering expanding benefits, including flexible working arrangements (FWAs), in a bid to retain their top talent. If you offer flexible working roles, ensure that your staff relay this information at interview stage.Cover the right questionsIf you’re wondering how to determine if a candidate is a good fit, asking the following questions will help shed light on the personality of your interviewees and their alignment with your values:What motivates you? How do you handle conflict in the workplace?What work environment supports innovation and productivity levels? Give me an example of something that you have taught yourself in the last six monthsWhat experiences have shaped your outlook on life?What are you most proud of?Utilize personality testsPersonality tests provide valuable insights into how prospective employees approach problems. They can also shed light on their ability to work alongside others and offer further information about their interests and preferences.Some of the most common personality tests used by employers include the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, the Caliper Profile and the 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire.Other key considerationsWhilst cultural fit is of great importance, it should be weighed alongside other factors. Hiring solely for cultural fit can perpetuate bias and lead to a lack of diversity within the workplace as a result. It’s also important to take into consideration an applicant’s qualifications, work experience, career aspirations and skill set when assessing their suitability for a role in your organization.Secure Life Sciences Talent with EPM ScientificAre you looking to solve your talent challenges? EPM Scientific offers bespoke talent solutions across Life Sciences A combination of our specialist account management service, ongoing support and reporting, and hiring advice allows us to find you exactly the people you need, when you need them. Register your vacancy or request a call back today.Our Talent Expertise​​​

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Benefits of Life Sciences Contract Work Image
Pharmacology

Benefits of Life Sciences Contract Work

According to Statista, 86.5 million people in the United States alone will be freelancing by 2027, which is more than half of the country’s workforce – and this is a trend that’s not limited to the US. In Europe, it’s estimated that there are already 32.3 million freelancers making up 15% of the total labor market.If you’re in the Life Sciences sector, you can enjoy the benefits of contract work. The big question is, would a contract job be the right choice for you? This is an important question especially if you’ve built your career in permanent roles. Consider the benefits of being a contract employee and weigh them up against your own priorities to be better able to make an informed decision.The benefit of higher payHigher pay is one of the benefits of contract work. There’s a misconception that Life Sciences contractors do not earn as much as those in permanent roles, but the reality is that most Life Science companies are often willing to pay contract workers more money.  One of the reasons for this is that those companies do not have to cover health benefits, social security taxes, 401K (retirement) contributions, unemployment compensation, or Medicare for contract workers. They also understand that they need to compensate for the lack of company benefits and a steady income, especially if those contractors have a high level of expertise in their field.Freedom of choiceThe freedom to choose who you work with, where you work, and for how long you work is another of the benefits of contract jobs. As a contractor, you can carefully select the Life Sciences companies you want to work for, and you can choose roles or projects that interest you and avoid those that don’t. In addition, you can select the contracts that best suit you, whether you consider the location in which you will be based or the length of the contract.Gaining broad skills and experienceThe potential to gain much broader skillsets and a wealth of experience is another benefit of contract work in the Life Sciences sector. Making this benefit even more attractive is that you can do this in a relatively short time.As a contractor, you probably will fill a specific role for a variety of Life Sciences companies. By working on different projects in those companies, you will gain insights into and experience in a diversity of systems and workflows, some of which will be unique to specific companies. This is not possible if you remain a permanent employee within one company.Contract work also keeps work experience fresh, as your responsibilities are not likely to become monotonous or repetitive. The continued challenges that come your way are opportunities to diversify your skillset, which will count in your favor as you continue to progress your career through contract jobs. Find the right roleSince 2012, EPM Scientific has placed candidates in their next Life Sciences role, including both contract and permanent positions. Register your resume on our site to access the latest role​s on the Life Sciences job market and find out how we can help you define your next career move.​

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